EAG 2017 London: The technological landscape of affective artificial general intelligence (Daniel Eth)

Source: Effective Altruism Global (video).

EAG 2017 London: The Open Philanthropy Project’s work on AI risk (Helen Toner)

Updates on the Open Philanthropy Project’s work to build the field of technical AI safety research and to support initial work on AI strategy and policy. This talk will also include some comments on how interested attendees can get involved in these issues.

Source: Effective Altruism Global (video).

EAG 2017 London: Biotechnology and existential risk (Andrew Snyder-Beattie)

In the decades to come, advances in biotechnology could pose new risks to humanity. This talk will provide an introductory overview of these risks within the framework effective altruism.

Source: Effective Altruism Global (video).

EAG 2017 London: Reducing wild-animal suffering through research (Persis Eskander)

Wild animals exist in huge numbers. Their aggregate suffering occurs on an enormous scale. However, very few people are concerned. The neglectedness of wild­animal suffering (WAS) is, in part, due to the complexity of conceiving solutions to it. If WAS advocates stand any chance at finding cost-effective interventions, they need support. This presentation considers three research strategies: wildlife management, the impact of human activities on WAS, and wild animal experiences; and explores the role they’ll play in building the WAS movement.

Source: Effective Altruism Global (video).

EAG 2017 London: Prioritisation and economics (Max Dalton)

Note: There’s a casual conversation that overlaps with the speaker during the first couple of minutes, probably because someone forgot to turn off a microphone.

Prioritisation research asks lots of different types of questions (moral and empirical, theoretical and applied). First, I argue that economics can provide a structure for thinking about these prioritisation problems. This highlights that prioritisation is even more difficult than it might intuitively seem. Second, economics could benefit from being a bit more like prioritisation research. In particular, it should be more strategic in the ways it simplifies things.

Source: Effective Altruism Global (video).